Traffic education – YNRTSA http://ynrtsa.org/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 19:37:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ynrtsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/ynr-120x120.png Traffic education – YNRTSA http://ynrtsa.org/ 32 32 Cal Thomas: Competition and Necessary Choice in Education https://ynrtsa.org/cal-thomas-competition-and-necessary-choice-in-education/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://ynrtsa.org/cal-thomas-competition-and-necessary-choice-in-education/ For the third consecutive day last week, the Chicago Teachers Union canceled classes, choosing to return to virtual learning and citing the dangers of the omicron variant as an excuse. For many, this is seen only as a teachers’ strike and takeover by a union that historically supports Democratic politicians. Democrats send federal aid to […]]]>

For the third consecutive day last week, the Chicago Teachers Union canceled classes, choosing to return to virtual learning and citing the dangers of the omicron variant as an excuse.

For many, this is seen only as a teachers’ strike and takeover by a union that historically supports Democratic politicians. Democrats send federal aid to the union, and the union then uses it to get more votes for Democrats. Does anyone else see a double problem in this mutual scratching system?

When Boston police went on strike in 1919, then Massachusetts Governor Calvin Coolidge called the strikers “deserters” and “traitors,” adding in a telegram to Samuel Gompers, chairman of the American Federation of Labor, “There is no right to strike against public safety by anyone, anywhere, anytime.

While the situation in Chicago is different from the Boston police strike, the refusal of teachers to return to classrooms is causing a different kind of harm to children and parents. There is the mental and emotional damage to children, in addition to the challenges associated with learning at home and the financial and childcare strain on parents.

The federal government provided Illinois $ 5 billion to keep schools open and classroom instruction. Like many other states, Illinois used the money for other purposes. While technically permissible, politicians should demand reimbursement if states and cities are not using the money for the purposes for which it was intended.

Could the fact that most private and religious schools remained open during the pandemic could be because they did not have union bosses dictating them?

There may never be a better time to shatter the power of teacher unions, and what is possibly America’s last monopoly, the public school system.

The choice of school is the answer. Competition works in all other areas. It can also work in education. Currently, there are 27 voucher programs in 16 states and the District of Columbia, according to State Education Commission. More is needed and now is the time for voters to pressure politicians to create them in other states that do not offer them.

Illinois offers Kindergarten to Grade 12 students and their parents several types of school choices, including two private programs, charter schools, magnetic schools, home schooling, and school choice. public intra-district via an open registration policy ”, according to edchoice.org. More parents should investigate and benefit from it.

The intellectual, moral and patriotic education of our children is the key to maintaining the country from which we have benefited for more than two centuries. Other countries, especially China, are ahead of us when it comes to math and science. They send many of their best students here to be educated at our best universities, and many then return to China to apply what they have learned in a way that promotes their country’s interests which are often contrary to ours.

One of the definitions of “monopoly” is “an exclusive privilege to operate a business, traffic or service, granted by a government”.

The education monopoly is long past its expiration date and must be dismantled. This will allow parents, not the government, to decide which system is best for their children. The choice of education prioritizes children over government and unions.

Cal Thomas is a union columnist.


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Artificial Intelligence in Education Market Size, Share, Growth, Trend and Forecast to 2027 https://ynrtsa.org/artificial-intelligence-in-education-market-size-share-growth-trend-and-forecast-to-2027/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 05:43:00 +0000 https://ynrtsa.org/artificial-intelligence-in-education-market-size-share-growth-trend-and-forecast-to-2027/ The global market for artificial intelligence in the education sector is expected to reach a market size of $ 17.83 billion by 2027. SURREY, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA, January 10, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ – The global education artificial intelligence market is expected to reach a market size of $ 17.83 billion by 2027 and register a significantly […]]]>

The global market for artificial intelligence in the education sector is expected to reach a market size of $ 17.83 billion by 2027.

SURREY, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA, January 10, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ – The global education artificial intelligence market is expected to reach a market size of $ 17.83 billion by 2027 and register a significantly high CAGR, according to the latest analysis from Emergen Research . The growing demand for real-time learner progress tracking and analysis solutions is one of the major growth factors of Global Artificial Intelligence in the education sector market, and it is expected to increase further. exponentially over the forecast period.

The report provides a detailed overview of how the pandemic has affected key segments of the artificial intelligence industry in the education sector. The report includes an in-depth impact analysis of the COVID-19 pandemic on the entire Artificial Intelligence industry in the education sector. The report contains opinions from unbiased industry experts on the current market scenario, past market performance, production and consumption rates, demand and supply ratio, and generation forecast. income during the estimated period.

Get a sample of the report: https://www.emergenresearch.com/request-sample/484

The current COVID-19 pandemic is expected to impact the growth of the Artificial Intelligence industry in the education sector mainly due to movement restrictions and the impact on supply and demand due to blockages. The COVID-19 pandemic has affected several sectors of the global market, and the Artificial Intelligence sector in the education sector is expected to feel the impact of the pandemic. The economic slowdown and dynamic changes in demand will further affect the growth of the industry. Report Covers Impact Analysis of COVID-19 Pandemic on Global Artificial Intelligence in Education Industry

The main players in the market are Google LLC, Microsoft Corporation, Amazon Web Services, Inc., International Business Machines Corporation, Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp, Pearson PLC, Nuance Communications Inc., Blackboard Inc., Carnegie Learning, Inc. and Cognii, Inc .

The growing demand for real-time learner progress tracking and analysis solutions and the growing demand for AI technology to simplify administrative processes in institutions are driving the deployment of artificial intelligence in the education sector. worldwide.

Scope of Artificial Intelligence in Education Market: Market Size: $ 1.08 Billion in 2019, Market Growth: at a CAGR of 43.8%, Market Trends: Increase in Equity Funding -risk in EdTech companies

One of the central components of the report is the broad segmentation of the Artificial Intelligence market in the education sector which includes the range of product types, the spectrum of applications, the landscape of the end-user industry. , major geographic regions and major market competitors. The financial positions of major players, along with their gross profit, sales volumes, sales revenue, manufacturing costs, and other financial ratios, have been accurately assessed in the report. In addition, several analytical tools such as investment valuation, SWOT analysis and Porter’s five forces analysis have been implemented by our team of analysts to assess the production and distribution capabilities of Artificial intelligence market players in the education sector.

Emergen Research has segmented the global artificial intelligence in the education sector market on the basis of deployment, technology, application, end use, and region.

Deployment Outlook (Revenue, USD Billion; 2020-2027)
Cloud based
On the site

Technology Outlook (Revenue, USD Billion; 2020-2027)
Natural language processing
Deep learning
Machine learning

Application Outlook (Revenue, USD Billion; 2020-2027)
Virtual learning environment
Smart content
Intelligent tutoring systems
Others

End-Use Outlook (Revenue, USD Billion; 2020-2027)
Education K-12
Higher Education
Company apprenticeship

Request a discount on the report: https://www.emergenresearch.com/request-discount/484

To help the business owner acquire more business intelligence, the study of Artificial Intelligence in Education Market for the forecast period 2020-2027 sheds light on data on production capacity, capacity consumption, purchasing power, feasibility of investments and technological innovation. An in-depth assessment of market performance in different regions is presented through self-explanatory graphical images, charts and tables that add weight to corporate presentations and marketing materials. The study offers regional profiles of the main suppliers and a detailed breakdown at the country level to help companies make a sound investment decision when exploring new regions.

Table of Contents of Global Artificial Intelligence in Education Market Report:

Chapter 1 describes the introduction of Artificial Intelligence in the Education Industry, market overview, product offerings, growth opportunities, market risks, driving forces, and challenges.

Chapter 2 analyzes the major manufacturers of Artificial Intelligence in Education Industry along with Sales, Revenue and Price of Artificial Intelligence in Education Industry during the forecast period.

Chapter 3 studies the competitive situation among major manufacturers and suppliers, along with sales, revenue and market share.

Chapter 4 analyzes the global market by regions, with the education artificial intelligence sales, revenue and market share, for each region, from 2020 to 2027.

Chapters 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 analyze the Artificial Intelligence in Education market by type, application, regions and manufacturers, with sales, revenue and market share by key countries of these regions… Continued

Key points of artificial intelligence in the education sector market:

Extensive coverage of artificial intelligence market analysis in the education sector

Key insights into the regional distribution of the industry in key geographies

Radical insight into vital market trends; current and emerging trends, and factors influencing market growth

Comprehensive coverage of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the overall growth of the Artificial Intelligence in the education sector market

Comprehensive data on the major manufacturers and suppliers of the Artificial Intelligence in Education market

The Artificial Intelligence in Education Market report examines the revenue and cost-benefit analysis of major market players in detail. It also focuses on strategic initiatives taken by companies to gain a solid foothold in the market, such as mergers and acquisitions, collaborations, joint ventures, partnerships, corporate and government agreements and licensing agreements, among others. It covers the overview of the company, expansion plans, gross profit margins, revenue growth, production and manufacturing capacity, product portfolio and financial condition of companies. SWOT analysis and Porter’s five forces analysis are also covered to offer a detailed analysis of the key companies operating in the market.

Read more: https://www.emergenresearch.com/industry-report/artificial-intelligence-in-the-education-sector-market

About Us:
At Emergen Research, we believe in the advancement of technology. We are a growing market research and strategy consulting company with a comprehensive knowledge base of cutting-edge and potentially disruptive technologies in the market that are expected to become more prevalent over the next decade.

Contact us:

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Kemp Announces GEER II Funding to Support Education | News https://ynrtsa.org/kemp-announces-geer-ii-funding-to-support-education-news/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 19:15:00 +0000 https://ynrtsa.org/kemp-announces-geer-ii-funding-to-support-education-news/ Governor Brian P. Kemp on Monday announced the recipients of the first round of the second tranche of the Governors’ Education Emergency Fund (GEER II), totaling more than $ 47 million in additional emergency aid to support primary and higher education institutions. as they continue to face the disruption and challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. […]]]>

Governor Brian P. Kemp on Monday announced the recipients of the first round of the second tranche of the Governors’ Education Emergency Fund (GEER II), totaling more than $ 47 million in additional emergency aid to support primary and higher education institutions. as they continue to face the disruption and challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“As we strive to meet the needs of students, parents and teachers by sustaining in-person learning, we know that our schools and education support organizations will need extra help,” said said Kemp. “We also know that our education service providers play a critical role in providing the workforce needed to combat the health and economic effects of the pandemic. This round of funding is focused on the goal of keeping our children in the classroom with minimal disruption in their education while strengthening this pipeline from the classroom to the workforce. Working around the clock, we overcame the challenges presented by COVID-19 for nearly three school years. With this new round of support, we will help our educators and students cross the finish line of the pandemic. “

Classroom Grants – $ 15.4 million

Kemp will provide all K-12 teachers and paraprofessionals with $ 125 to use for classroom expenses. The Department of Early Childhood Care and Learning (DECAL) will also be prepared to mobilize federal funds for teachers and paraprofessionals from birth to age 5 to complement this decision.

Teachers’ pipeline – $ 1.3 million

Kemp will invest $ 789,730 to fund the expansion of the Georgia Math & Reading Corps program in southwest Georgia. This is an existing program that helps students with high needs unlock their potential through evidence-based and data-driven tutoring. The funding will help improve student outcomes and recruit tutors – especially in rural Georgia – for daily education.

Kemp will also award $ 517,575 in funds to the Georgia Southern University Research and Service Foundation. This support will help expand Georgia’s teacher pool and accelerate literacy students by providing college professors for teaching reading to students in Kindergarten to Grade 5, promoting reading activities and writing skills, helping prospective teachers gain hands-on experience and developing best practices for mainstreaming tutoring support throughout the school. daytime.

Student mental health needs – $ 6 million

Kemp will extend the mental health initiative that was funded by GEER I until July 2023 with additional funds of $ 5.5 million. This will provide post-secondary students with better access to mental health resources and additional professional development opportunities for faculty.

Kemp will also award $ 510,410 for Trauma Informed Care (TIC) soothing stations and ICT soothing kits for individual families in the state, in support of wrap-around services through local YMCAs.

Healthcare Workforce Education Pipeline – $ 3.1 million

These funds will support the need for more nurses and additional training, with a particular focus on expanding educational opportunities to more areas of the state and providing healthcare services. ‘hands-on learning experiences.

• Southwest Georgia State – $ 866,723

• State of Fort Valley – $ 1,320,150

• Central Georgia State – $ 900,000

PCOM Medicine Project (Moultrie Campus) – $ 820,202

To engage students early in their learning careers and inspire interest in the field of medicine, Governor Kemp provides funding to build partnerships between the K-12 school systems and the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. This support will also allow technological upgrades and means-tested assistance for student housing issues.

Workforce Training Pipeline for Commercial Drivers – $ 8.32 million

Kemp has earmarked these funds to address the critical need for more training opportunities for commercial drivers and the workforce, further addressing supply chain issues impacting state and country:

• Savannah Technical College – $ 1,990,000 for driving mat and trailers

• Georgia Piedmont Technical College – $ 2,000,000 for the driving range and pad, and trailers

• Oconee Fall Line Technical College – $ 1,150,000 for driving mat and simulators

• Columbus Technical College – $ 1,770,000 for a driving mat, mobile classroom, trailers and simulators

• Southern Crescent Technical College – $ 1,132,500 for driving range and platform resurfacing, mobile classroom and trailers

• Sud-Est Technical College – $ 275,000 for the practice and resurfacing of the slab

Improving Outcomes for Students with Dyslexia – $ 4.7 million

Based on SB 48 (2019), Kemp will provide these funds for a dyslexia screening and intervention tool for K-3 students. These funds will also be used to provide personalized reading instruction based on results, providing teachers with another resource to help students achieve success in reading. This project will reach 60,000 Kindergarten to Grade 3 students in 14 different school districts. In Georgia, it is important that we “test AND intervene”.

Rock Eagle Center 4-H – $ 2.2 million

Many Georgian families benefit from a visit to Rock Eagle, a crucial institution for hands-on learning experiences focused on agricultural and environmental information, leadership, communication skills, food and nutrition, health, energy conservation and citizenship. These funds will support the vital upgrades needed at the facility to increase safety and expand the possibilities for the learning experience.

Charter Schools Growth Initiative – $ 4.1 million

Charter schools offer parents the opportunity to choose the best learning environment for their children. Governor Kemp is allocating these funds to support the establishment and replication of 10 new high-quality charter schools in underserved communities. The funds will be used for start-up costs, networking opportunities, long-term planning support and other purposes.

STEM Education – $ 1 million

Governor Kemp provides funding to Georgia Youth Science & Technology Centers, Inc. to strengthen STEM learning with real-world information from industries across the state. Programming will focus on extracurricular enrichment options, family science events and the provision of technology to students. Counties that will benefit from these funds include Baker, Clay, Glascock, Hancock, Lincoln and Warren.

Georgia Music Education Grants – $ 200,000

Kemp provides funds to schools and nonprofit organizations across the state for music education, enriching the learning experience.

We live in an age of sequels, prequels, remakes, and even live-action adaptations of video games or cartoons. Click for more information.


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Colorado Democrats plan to tackle K-12 education and high cost of living in next session https://ynrtsa.org/colorado-democrats-plan-to-tackle-k-12-education-and-high-cost-of-living-in-next-session/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 12:20:07 +0000 https://ynrtsa.org/colorado-democrats-plan-to-tackle-k-12-education-and-high-cost-of-living-in-next-session/ It’s getting more and more expensive to live in Colorado, a fact Republicans rely on to help them in a midterm election year. State GOP leaders held a press conference in August at a Denver gas station, seeking to draw attention to rising fuel prices and blame Democrats – who control the State Senate, House […]]]>

It’s getting more and more expensive to live in Colorado, a fact Republicans rely on to help them in a midterm election year.

State GOP leaders held a press conference in August at a Denver gas station, seeking to draw attention to rising fuel prices and blame Democrats – who control the State Senate, House of Representatives and the Governor’s office – for the blow to people’s wallets.

As of Friday, average gasoline prices were $ 3.31 per gallon in Colorado, a 45% increase from the previous year. according to AAA. The Denver-Lakewood-Aurora consumer price index – which includes food, energy, housing, motor vehicles and medical care – jumped 6.5% from November 2020 to November 2021.

While Republicans tend to blame the cost increases on Democratic policies, economists say a variety of factors, including pervasive and pervasive supply chain problems, are likely playing a role. But Democrats plan to tackle affordability issues head-on this session, Senate Majority Leader Steve Fenberg and House Majority Leader Daneya Esgar said in an interview on Wednesday.

Other key Democratic priorities for the next session, which begins Jan. 12, include investing in K-12 education and public safety.

Reduced Fees and Costs of Prescription Drugs

“We hear this over and over again: people might get increases, but the price goes up as well, so are we really better off? Said Esgar. “We’re working to cut costs and improve affordability so Coloradians can actually keep more of their hard-earned money in their wallets. “

Governor Jared Polis’ budget proposal includes $ 104 million in fee relief for individuals and businesses. If approved by the Colorado General Assembly, the money would be used to cover paid family and medical leave premiums, which will take effect next year under a voting measure approved by voters; fees paid by health professionals such as nurses; and business license fees. Esgar also mentioned driver’s license fees as an area where Democrats are looking to improve affordability.

“We’re also going to continue our efforts to save people money on health care and prescription drug costs,” Esgar said, “including making sure drug discounts are actually passed on through. consumers. “

According to Center for Improving the Value of Healthcare, a Denver-based nonprofit that administers the Colorado All Payer Claims Database. Drug manufacturer discounts help cover the cost of a drug in exchange for an insurance plan putting that drug on its Preferred Drug List, or formulary.

Theoretically, the discounts could help reduce health insurance costs for consumers. However, opponents of the drug discounts say they are encouraging the use of more expensive brand name drugs without helping consumers save money on their drugs.

More money for K-12 education

In addition to working to lower fees and keep prescription drug costs under control, Esgar said Democrats plan to make the state’s largest investment in K-12 public education. They also plan to lay the groundwork for a 2023 launch of the universal preschool.

“Every year we have increased per student funding, and in the government budget it has put forward a strong proposal that continues that work,” Esgar said. “We plan to work closely together to achieve a common goal of actually investing in the students and teachers in our schools. “

Last year, lawmakers restored education spending to pre-COVID levels, budgeting $ 7.8 billion for K-12 education. This is an increase of 8.7% over the previous year.

Colorado’s 2021-2022 budget also significantly reduced what is known as the Fiscal Stabilization Factor, or negative factor: the amount of K-12 education funding required by a constitutional formula that takes into account population and inflation, which lawmakers withhold from paying for other priorities in the state budget. Lawmakers reduced the overall amount the state owes schools from $ 1.2 billion to $ 572 million last year.

Colorado House Majority Leader Daneya Esgar, D-Pueblo. (Colorado House Democrats)

Polis’ budget proposal for 2022-2023 would reduce the budget stabilization factor by an additional $ 150 million, making it the lowest since 2013.

“In addition to the historic increase in per student funding next year, we’re actually looking to prepay funds in the future so that we can actually support that increase,” Esgar said.

In 2020, Colorado voters approved increased taxes on nicotine products to fund Universal Kindergarten, a mainstay of Polis’ campaign platform. The state’s Early Childhood Leadership Commission released draft recommendations to guide the implementation of this program last month. Commission members will vote on Tuesday on whether to finalize the recommendations and send them to lawmakers at the General Assembly.

Grants to local police services

This session, Democrats plan to increase funding for local law enforcement agencies under a framework outlined in Polis’ budget request, Fenberg said.

“We will be working on a program to provide grants to local police forces to ensure that they are actually able to improve their community policing on the ground,” Fenberg said. “This will be done through incentives to create co-responder models, ensuring law enforcement has the resources to do better investigations and forensic work to break down criminal and criminal networks. other crimes we’ve seen statewide, largely matching the pandemic. “

Majority Leader Steve Fenberg
Senate Majority Leader Steve Fenberg speaks in the Senate on February 22, 2021 (Faith Miller / Colorado Newsline)

In October, 70 law enforcement agencies across Colorado participated in 28 co-responder programs funded by the state’s Office of Behavioral Health. The programs pair police officers with behavioral health clinicians to respond to people in crisis, with the goal of diverting them from the criminal justice system and connecting them to services instead.

Democrats are also looking for ways to prevent crime from happening, Fenberg said.

“This has led to us having a lot of conversations about the root causes of some of these crimes that we are seeing,” he said. “And at the end of the day, we think a lot of the causes relate to our other priorities, from a lack of behavioral health resources, to a skyrocketing addiction statewide.” or things like the lack of affordable housing for people. a safe place to live. We will look at these root causes and address them one by one. “

Federal pandemic relief money should go a long way in preventing crime, Fenberg added. Since the General Assembly adjourned in June, lawmakers from two separate task forces have worked on the American Rescue Plan Act’s $ 850 million spending recommendations for affordable housing and behavioral health.

Also on the Democrats’ public safety agenda, Fenberg said, preventing and responding to wildfires, as well as improving the state’s poor air quality. Last month’s Marshall Fire destroyed more than 1,000 homes in Louisville and Superior. While the Federal Emergency Management Agency provides assistance to those affected, there may be ways for the state to play a role in resolving the immediate crisis or helping communities rebuild, Fenberg said. .

Another pervasive public safety issue is air quality. For more than 60 days last year, air quality in the Denver metro area reached a level deemed by the Environmental Protection Agency to be “unhealthy for sensitive groups” – a designation that includes any adult with heart or lung disease, anyone over the age of 65 and all children under the age of 18.

The Denver metro was already classified as a “serious” violator of the EPA’s ozone standards under the Clean Air Act when in July 2021 it missed a deadline to become compliant. Meanwhile, a Newsline investigation in September revealed a culture of secrecy and political interference within the state’s air pollution control division.

A Democratic proposal led by Westminster Democrat Senator Faith Winter would provide free public transport during ozone season to encourage people to reduce their driving. Much of the state’s ground-level ozone – formed by chemical reactions between sunlight and pollutants like nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds – is caused by gasoline vehicle engines.

Democrats’ efforts to improve air quality will include “making sure we do everything we can to bring our ozone under control through major investments in transportation infrastructure,” Fenberg said, “but also ensuring that that the Air Pollution Control Division can regulate them effectively. industries, can monitor, better model and enforce the laws we have to get our ozone problem under control. “


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Tax cuts, changes in education among GOP legislative priorities https://ynrtsa.org/tax-cuts-changes-in-education-among-gop-legislative-priorities/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 15:31:09 +0000 https://ynrtsa.org/tax-cuts-changes-in-education-among-gop-legislative-priorities/ DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) – The Iowa legislature begins the 2022 session on Monday with nearly $ 2 billion in the bank and strong demand from Republican legislative leaders and the governor to cut taxes. There will be a setback from Democrats and others calling for spending some of the excess money on priority areas […]]]>

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) – The Iowa legislature begins the 2022 session on Monday with nearly $ 2 billion in the bank and strong demand from Republican legislative leaders and the governor to cut taxes.

There will be a setback from Democrats and others calling for spending some of the excess money on priority areas such as public schools and improving child care, and leaders on both sides acknowledge that Iowa would face the shortage of workers to fill vacancies.

Controversial social issues are also likely to surface, as some of their most ardent supporters urge Republicans to ban abortion and limit access to books that some consider too salty for school libraries.


All 150 lawmakers and staff will return to Capitol Hill without a mask, vaccine or test required, as COVID-19 continues to spread rapidly throughout the state.

Here are some questions that should be given priority this session:

TAX REDUCTIONS

With Republicans in charge of the legislative branch and governor’s office, the popular political promise of tax cuts is the order of the day. Iowa and many other states saw a one-time boost in federal COVID-19 aid, which fueled an increase in consumer spending that pushed up tax collection and state revenues. The challenge is figuring out what happens to state revenues when the impact of federal funding declines, although Gov. Kim Reynolds and Republican legislative leaders say it’s their stewardship of the Iowa economy that contributed the most to the cash surplus. Iowa has over $ 2 billion in excess cash. Reynolds and Republican lawmakers say they plan to offer significant tax cuts. Democrats argue that any tax cut should target middle-to-low-income Iowans and small businesses, and go towards programs to help working Iowans, including job training, paid family time off, child care. children and housing.

LABOR

Iowa suffers from a severe labor shortage. Reynolds has said she will bring forward a comprehensive bill that includes proposed changes to unemployment benefits. “The unemployment code was written a long, long time ago, when we were in a very different position and today we have to encourage people to work, not pay people to stay at home”, she declared. Democrats partly attribute the labor shortage to Republican-backed policies on socially divisive issues such as abortion limits, restricted voting rights and ignoring a call for l action on civil rights. “Over the past five years of Republican control, these cultural warfare tactics have made it even more difficult to retain current workers in Iowa or to recruit and attract new workers to Iowa,” the leader said. Senate Democrat Zach Wahls.

VACCINE MANDATES

Instead of taking steps to further discourage COVID-19 vaccine warrants, Reynolds and GOP legislative leaders have said it’s best to wait for the U.S. Supreme Court to rule on the policies of the U.S. Biden administration. Reynolds opposes vaccine warrants proposed by Biden in federal court cases. Some lawmakers want to ban companies from requiring the shots. Last year, Reynolds signed a law passed by Republicans that allows employees to opt out of vaccine requirements for health or religious reasons and makes workers eligible for unemployment benefits if they are made redundant for refusing the vaccine. Speaker of the House Pat Grassley said he agreed, but the legislature should be ready to act if the courts allow warrants to continue.

ABORTION

Republican lawmakers opposed to abortion rights are eager to push for abortion restrictions, which could include a proposal similar to a Texas law that ended abortions but is now being challenged in the State Supreme Court -United. If the court overturns the Roe v. Wade, he would send the abortion policy back to every state. Reynolds and Grassley said they were inclined to wait for court rulings before taking further action.

EDUCATION

Republicans seem poised to change laws regarding the control of books in school libraries. Reynolds said parents need more transparency in what their children are going through at school. “Parents need to know what books are in the library to give them a chance to weigh,” she said. Amy Sinclair, who chairs the Senate education committee, said her highest priority “is to talk about a parent’s bill of rights,” which may include monitoring what books are available to children and what is taught in classrooms. Democratic Representative Jennifer Konfrst said Republican rhetoric about schools, including the discussion about removing library books, has contributed to a teacher shortage.

RACIAL PROFILING

Reynolds said she plans to come up with legislation that would help tackle racial profiling in Iowa after signing a bill last year that disappointed many civil rights activists. The bill signed by Reynolds strengthened criminal penalties for certain protest activity and offered protections for law enforcement, ignoring promised racial profiling language. His proposal will likely be based on recommendations from a task force chaired by Lt. Gov. Adam Gregg, which focused on a Nebraska law that automatically collects data on the race of individuals arrested by police.


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Kajeet appoints industry veteran Chris Felix as vice president of education sales https://ynrtsa.org/kajeet-appoints-industry-veteran-chris-felix-as-vice-president-of-education-sales/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 22:29:53 +0000 https://ynrtsa.org/kajeet-appoints-industry-veteran-chris-felix-as-vice-president-of-education-sales/ MCLEAN, Virginia. – January 8, 2022 – Kajeet®, a leading provider of IoT connectivity, software and hardware solutions that deliver secure, reliable and controlled Internet connectivity to nearly 3,000 customers, today announced the appointment of Chris Felix to the newly created role of Vice -President of sales within his education activity. In this role, Felix […]]]>

MCLEAN, Virginia. January 8, 2022 – Kajeet®, a leading provider of IoT connectivity, software and hardware solutions that deliver secure, reliable and controlled Internet connectivity to nearly 3,000 customers, today announced the appointment of Chris Felix to the newly created role of Vice -President of sales within his education activity. In this role, Felix will spearhead business development and account management for Kajeet’s global education clients, further strengthening its mission to bridge the digital divide in education and beyond.

“Although significant progress has been made in eradicating digital inequalities, more than one billion school-aged students around the world still do not have adequate internet access at home. At Kajeet, we believe this is unacceptable, ”said Daniel JW Neal, President, CEO and Founder of Kajeet. “The addition of Chris to our mission-driven team will support our strategic growth in the global education market and strengthen our position as a leading provider of safe, reliable and secure IoT connectivity solutions for students and educators. . “

Felix is ​​a seasoned and strategic leader who brings over 30 years of telecommunications experience to his new role. Prior to joining Kajeet, he served for four years as Vice President and General Manager of Government Solutions at Sprint, where he successfully revitalized his Federal Government sector and aligned two business organizations into one unified team in the process. of its merger with T-Mobile. Felix began his career in telecommunications at Verizon Wireless, where he quickly progressed to managerial positions. Throughout his 27-year tenure at Verizon, Felix held a number of leadership roles, including three years as regional president of the upstate New York region of Verizon and three years as vice-president. president of sales for the federal government.

“I am honored to join the Kajeet team and to work alongside such a talented and dedicated group of professionals,” said Felix. “I look forward to driving the strategic growth of the education division and expanding the impact of Kajeet’s innovative connectivity solutions into new geographic markets. “

About Kajeet
Kajeet provides optimized IoT connectivity, software and hardware solutions that deliver secure, reliable and controlled Internet connectivity to nearly 3,000 businesses, schools and districts, state and local governments, and IoT solution providers. Kajeet is the industry’s only managed IoT connectivity service provider to offer a scalable IoT management platform, Sentinel®, which includes complete visibility into real-time data usage, policy control management, Custom content filters for increased security and multi-network flexibility. Whether it’s enabling digital access that ensures student success, enabling businesses to connect and control devices in the field, or offering support and a platform to launch a complex mobile solution, Kajeet is recognized by many. to make powerful and flexible wireless solutions easy. Kajeet is available for hybrid and multi-network access on all major North American wireless networks, worldwide in 173 other countries, and on several licensed and unlicensed networks. Kajeet holds 40 US patents in mobile technologies. To find out more, visit kajeet.com and follow us on Twitter at @Kajeet.

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Watch now: Eureka High grad learns the ropes at sea | Local education https://ynrtsa.org/watch-now-eureka-high-grad-learns-the-ropes-at-sea-local-education/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 04:07:35 +0000 https://ynrtsa.org/watch-now-eureka-high-grad-learns-the-ropes-at-sea-local-education/ Macy Littell, a junior from Wellesley College, shares her month-long experience on a sailing research vessel last semester. GOODFIELD – If anyone in Woodford County needs to know how to navigate and navigate a 130ft tall ship using the stars, look no further than Macy Littell. It can also help them save coral reefs and […]]]>

Macy Littell, a junior from Wellesley College, shares her month-long experience on a sailing research vessel last semester.



GOODFIELD – If anyone in Woodford County needs to know how to navigate and navigate a 130ft tall ship using the stars, look no further than Macy Littell. It can also help them save coral reefs and introduce them to a myriad of types of plankton.

Some of his advice may sound like it came straight out of “Moby Dick”.

“It’s something I feel connected to now – the old sailboat literature,” she said.

A native of Goodfield and now a junior at Wellesley College in Massachusetts, Littell spent his fall semester learning and researching plankton in the Caribbean across Association for sea education Semester.






Macy Littell, a native of Goodfield, works in the lab aboard the SSV Corwith Cramer while at sea in the fall as part of the Semester of the Sea Education Association program.


PHOTO PROVIDED


Littell learned to do all of this aboard the SSV Corwith Cramer, one of SEA Semester’s two research vessels. The “SSV” stands for “Sailing school ship”. The program describes the ship, named after the program founder, as the first research vessel of its kind with a brigantine sail arrangement.

The SEA semester offers college students programs that allow them to take a “study abroad” program but at sea. The first half of the semester was held in Woods Hole, Mass., Also the location of the SEA. ‘a leading marine science and engineering research laboratory, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The second half of the semester, from November 23 to December 23, took place at sea.

Three weeks of them were spent without docking in a port, she said. The course took them from the US Virgin Islands to the south along the line of the Caribbean islands that extend to the Venezuelan coast and then return.






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Littell studies plankton in coral reefs versus plankton on the high seas.


Connor wood



Have a good trip

The trip was a whole new experience for Littell. She recalls that in college she was told that it was impossible for her, as a person who grew up in Illinois, to seriously pursue marine biology. When it came time to choose a college, she knew she wanted a place that would give her those kinds of opportunities, and she found it in Wellesley.

She had worked in labs at Wellesley before doing the SEA semester, but these were mostly animal care labs, she said. On board the Corwith Cramer, each student had their own research project. Littell has studied the differences between plankton on reefs and plankton on the high seas.

The ship had a full lab, but it uses space in a very different way than how a land lab with room to expand would. Ships and sailors need to be extremely good at two things, Littell said: saving space and keeping things in place.

“Everything is very narrow, there is a lot of conservation of space,” she said.

Along with his individual project, Littell also helped take surveys of the reefs, where they counted the number of fish, corals and other invertebrates they found. They would also be looking for the disease of rocky coral tissue loss, which has spread to the area.






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The arc of SSV Corwith Cramer points to a rainbow.


PHOTO PROVIDED


“Part of our job was to share with the government and the University of the Virgin Islands where we saw it,” she said.

The disease kills the coral and leaves behind a white skeleton of the ancient living coral. It was first observed in the U.S. Virgin Islands in January 2019, according to the Territory’s Department of Planning and Natural Resources.

The department has set up a citizen science project to track coral diseases through community reports. Since 2019 more than 450 citizen inquiries were reported.

Deck wiping

At the same time, the students were also the crew of the ship. They learned to navigate a tall ship, including getting on and off the dit, sailing and steering. It was a lot to learn for Littell, and he was not helped by severe seasickness his early days on board.

She spent most of those first few days on deck, because going down below only made it worse. On the ocean, far from any light pollution, she could see more stars than ever.






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Dolphins race SSV Corwith Cramer.


PHOTO PROVIDED


“You are nauseous and miserable, but there is always beauty,” she said.

Beyond the simple study of marine biology, students live there. They saw two different species of dolphins and the wake of the ships was filled with flying fish, as well as sea birds that followed the boat to feast on the flying fish. Littell was even lucky enough to see a six foot stingray snorkeling and two humpback whales from the ship.

Students would be on shifts of six hours, followed by 12 hours of rest, which included time to eat, she said.

During their shift, the students had to do everything from changing the sails to the navigation to the dishes. With more than 30 people on board, there was also plenty of dishes to wash, Littell said.

She even had to help once in registering contact details during a disaster situation. A boat had made a distress call but its radios could not reach the rescue vessel picking it up, so the Corwith Cramer had to relay messages back and forth, she said. His job was to record the coordinates of the sinking ship.

Watch Now: Improved Defense Triggers Eureka Before Game With Former Coach EPG

Nature has become the driving force of their time, even outside of research. Wind and weather dictated how they should change the sails while the lookout, required every shift, watched for dangers on the horizon.






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the SSV Corwith Cramer, Sea Education Association, Woods Hole, Mass., Dockside.


PHOTO PROVIDED


“There is such a connection to nature and dependence on nature, in a way that I have never experienced before,” Littell said.

Earth ho

Littell returns to Wellesley on January 20 to begin his second semester of his junior year. She is already considering options after graduation, including working for the SEA semester. She would love to go back and continue to do research, while also being a part of the experience of other students like her.

She also made new friends among her shipmates. Ship mates have a bond that exists regardless of personal feelings towards the person, because everyone should trust each other.

“It’s very similar to being with family (…) you take care of them and they take care of you,” she said.

The crew was also together all month, especially because of COVID protocols. They had to stay pretty much just with this set of people all the time, to avoid potentially bringing disease back to the boat.

Littell hopes those who had experiences like she did in college and were told her dreams were unrealistic will know that is not true.

“If you have the desire to get out of Illinois or explore the ocean, you can do it,” she said.

Contact Connor Wood at (309) 820-3240. Follow Connor on Twitter: @connorkwood


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Jackson Middle School Principal Named Regional Director of the Year | Education https://ynrtsa.org/jackson-middle-school-principal-named-regional-director-of-the-year-education/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 22:57:00 +0000 https://ynrtsa.org/jackson-middle-school-principal-named-regional-director-of-the-year-education/ Jackson Middle School’s KaTrinka Brown is greeted by college students and cheerleaders in a surprise celebration Friday where she found out she was the Piedmont-Triad Region Director of the Year. Jackson Middle School’s KaTrinka Brown finds out that she is the Piedmont-Triad Region Principal of the Year in a surprise celebration Friday at the school. […]]]>

GREENSBORO – When elementary students take field trips to see Jackson Middle School, KaTrinka Brown sometimes likes to surprise them.

She will drive the bus to pick them up, but will wait until they get to Jackson to introduce herself as the principal of the school.

Brown got her own surprise on Friday when she walked into the school library to cheers and applause from school cheerleaders, other students, staff and principals, who revealed that she had been named director of the year for the Piedmont-Triad region. . It also means she’s a finalist to become North Carolina Principal of the Year.

“It’s amazing,” Brown said. “I love my students. I love our community. I like our staff.

Brown was named Guilford County Schools Principal of the Year this fall and then moved on to the regional level of competition. The Piedmont-Triad region of the North Carolina Department of Education consists of 11 county districts and five city districts.

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In a brief interview after the celebration, Brown said she takes pride in being able to do a bit of any job at her school, including driving a bus. Brown said she has had a commercial driver’s license for a long time and often helps students get to sporting events and other activities.


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Philadelphia Children’s Hospital supports in-person education https://ynrtsa.org/philadelphia-childrens-hospital-supports-in-person-education/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 22:45:42 +0000 https://ynrtsa.org/philadelphia-childrens-hospital-supports-in-person-education/ The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) supports in-person education and has revised its guidelines for school closures amid the COVID-19 pandemic. CHOP’s new recommendations come “at a time when all adults and youth in K-12 facilities have been offered immunizations” and with “evidence that COVID-19 is becoming a milder infection in most children.” “Throughout the […]]]>

The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) supports in-person education and has revised its guidelines for school closures amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

CHOP’s new recommendations come “at a time when all adults and youth in K-12 facilities have been offered immunizations” and with “evidence that COVID-19 is becoming a milder infection in most children.”

“Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, schools (and especially students) have been asked to shoulder a significant burden to avoid the risk of serious illness in an unvaccinated public,” CHOP said in its guidelines for schools. “Now that all K-12 school communities have been offered immunizations, the competing risks for children of education loss due to prolonged school closures alongside social isolation are of much greater concern. than COVID-19 itself. “

An empty yard at a public school temporarily closed for in-person learning in Philadelphia on January 6, 2022 (Hannah Beier / Bloomberg)

The hospital added that “while it is too early to conclude that COVID-19 has become an endemic seasonal virus like influenza, the decline in virulence shows signs that we are moving quickly in that direction, particularly for vaccinated persons “.

SCHOOL CLOSURES CREATE “INCREDIBLE STRESS” ON CHILDREN AND PARENTS: INDEPENDENT WOMEN’S FORUM

“Now, with limited access to testing at community sites and many schools overwhelmed with contact tracing and required testing solutions that are no longer feasible or sustainable, the time has come to move towards solutions that provide prioritizing the standardization of school education in all communities alongside practical safety measures, ”said CHOP.

Hospital counseling allows exposed but asymptomatic students and staff to stay in school. Additionally, weekly testing for asymptomatic students and staff is halted, and schools will remain open if 10% of staff are absent compared to 3%, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer. first reported.

Its mitigation recommendations include indoor masking, efforts by staff with respiratory illnesses to stay home while showing symptoms, testing for students and staff with mild symptoms of COVID-19 and booster vaccinations.

More than 80% of school staff in Philadelphia were fully immunized by October, according to the school district. Those who are not vaccinated are subject to regular testing.

SCHOOLS IN THE US CLOSE AGAIN AS CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH DECLARES NATIONAL CRISIS

Schools in Philadelphia reopened after winter recess this week, but switched to virtual learning on Friday due to a winter storm and staff shortages linked to COVID-19, Superintendent William Hite said in a statement. letter to parents.

“As we’ve shared before, we’re committed to making school-by-school decisions based on the most recent staffing data, which can change quickly,” Hite said. “District leaders will continue to monitor staff data from all of our schools on a daily basis throughout this week and over the weekend.”

A health worker administers a dose of a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine during an immunization clinic at the Grand Yesha Ballroom in Philadelphia.  (AP Photo / Matt Rourke, file)

A health worker administers a dose of a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine during an immunization clinic at the Grand Yesha Ballroom in Philadelphia. (AP Photo / Matt Rourke, file)

As of Wednesday, the city had 5,500 positive cases for COVID-19. The Philadelphia Department of Public Health on Friday recorded 2,858 new cases and a positivity rate of nearly 38%.

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More than 74% of adults in Philadelphia are fully vaccinated, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

More than 5,200 schools in the United States closed in the first week of the year, some of which will remain closed until Jan. 16, according to community events website Burbio, which has tracked school closures in about 5 000 school districts during the pandemic.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has also supports in-person learning.


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Applications are open for “Excellence in Education in Eastern Wisconsin” for 2022 – WFRV Local 5 – Green Bay, Appleton https://ynrtsa.org/applications-are-open-for-excellence-in-education-in-eastern-wisconsin-for-2022-wfrv-local-5-green-bay-appleton/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 14:55:34 +0000 https://ynrtsa.org/applications-are-open-for-excellence-in-education-in-eastern-wisconsin-for-2022-wfrv-local-5-green-bay-appleton/ The fight for freedom upsets No.3 Winneconne Video / 13 hours ago Video High School Hoops 1/6: FVL remains undefeated, Denmark manages Wrightstown Video / 13 hours ago Video Neenah’s boys basketball stays hot and shoots Kimberly down in thriller Video / 3 days ago Video Inside Skinny: Couple Pass By 3 Rental Cars To […]]]>

The fight for freedom upsets No.3 Winneconne

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High School Hoops 1/6: FVL remains undefeated, Denmark manages Wrightstown

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Neenah’s boys basketball stays hot and shoots Kimberly down in thriller

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Inside Skinny: Couple Pass By 3 Rental Cars To Make Their First Trip To Lambeau Field

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St. Mary’s Springs takes second place, Notre Dame third at NDA Showcase

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‘Shawano Sundrop Shootout’ Highlights: Appleton East Hangs On, West De Pere Ends Strong

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Neenah’s boys beat Pewaukee

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HSSPX: Notre Dame GB defeats Hortonville, De Pere boys defeat Kimberly

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Cloakroom: the keys to the game

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Cloakroom: Overview of browns

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Inside Skinny: Aaron Rodgers’ Doppelgänger

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Locker room: recap of the victory against the Ravens

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